What is PCOS and what does it mean if you're hoping to start a family?

05Jul2017

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common condition that affects one in five women here in the UK. But what exactly is it? And what does it mean if you're hoping to start a family? Here's what you need to know about PCOS.

What are polycystic ovaries?

To understand what PCOS is, it helps to know what polycystic ovaries are.

'Having polycystic ovaries means that your ovaries contain about twice as many cysts as normal ovaries,' explains Verity, the national charity set up to improve the awareness of PCOS in the UK.

'The "cysts" in polycystic ovaries are actually egg-containing follicles that have not developed properly, due to a number of hormonal abnormalities.

'It was originally thought that these cysts caused the condition PCOS but we now know they are one of the symptoms of PCOS and not everyone will get them,' explains Verity.

So what exactly is PCOS?

PCOS or polycystic ovary syndrome is a common female hormone condition that affects how your ovaries work.

'Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the name given to a condition in which women with polycystic ovaries also have one or more additional symptoms,' says Verity.

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